Unique Dog Names March

Unique Dog Names March

Are you looking for a name for your new dog that’s a little different? A name that, when you call it at the dog park, won’t have 3 different pooches running up to you? Here is some inspiration if you just can’t quite come up with something unique on your own.

 

Female

  • Rogue. A superhero in the Marvel Universe associated with the X-Men with the superpower to drain the memories, strength, or superpowers of anyone she touches.
  • Navette. A style of gemstone cut, also called "marquise", characterized by its football shape.
  • Dassie. Dassie rats are a species of rock-dwelling rats that resemble squirrels with less bushy tails.
  • Cindy. The English diminutive of Cynthia. Cynthia was another name for the goddess Artemis to signify her birthplace on Mount Kynthos on the Greek island of Delos.
  • Jouska. A word for hypothetical conversations that you play over and over in your head although they never happened. For example, when you're imaging how a conversation with your boss will go if you ask for a raise.

 

Male

  • Alfie. The name of Mrs. Silver's pet tortoise in Roald Dahl's book "Esio Trot".
  • Brimsen. The Austrian term for Bryndza, a product of sheep's milk cheese made primarily in Slovakia, Romania, Moldova, and Serbia.
  • Tyro. A species of seahorse that is known from only one specimen caught off of the coast of the Seychelles.
  • Spivvins. A character in the third "Chronicles of Narnia" book, "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader". Spivvins is a school mate of Eustace Scrubb, cousin of the Pevensies.
  • Ceibo. A star in the constellation Chamaeleon that was named after the national flower of Uruguay.

 

Either/ Or

  • Pepo. Cucurbita pepo is the scientific name of the cultivated gourd whose varieties include pumpkin and acorn squash. It has been domesticated in the New World for thousands of years.
  • Nicky. A type of necktie knot that is a variant of the more symmetrical Pratt knot.
  • Tzippy (pronounced "tzee-pee"). The name of one of the monsters in Maurice Sendak's book "Where the Wild Things Are".
  • Saigon. A spice that comes from the tree Cinnamomum loureiroi that is also known as Vietnamese cinnamon.
  • Jumbee. A generic term for any manevolent mythical spirit or demon in the folklore of some Caribbean countries.